CVI, CVII, CVIII and CIX (Howitzer) Brigades (24th Divisional Artillery)

These units were formed as part of the raising of the Third New Army, K3. They are also sometimes shown as 106, 107, 108 and 109 (Howitzer) Brigades RFA.

CVI

  • This brigade was originally comprised of A, B, C and D Batter ies RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. It was placed under command of the 24th Division. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade then remained with the division throughout the war: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • On 13 May the Brigade Ammunition Column left, being merged into the 24th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 13 May 1916 D Battery left, becoming the A Battery of 109 Brigade. The D (Howitzer) Battery of that brigade joined in its place.
    • On 3 October 1916 the field gun batteries were made up to six guns each: two-gun sections from what had been A Battery of 109 Brigade joined A and B Batteries respectively, and C Battery wasjoined by a section from 109 Brigade’s B Battery.
    • D (Howitzer) Battery was also brought up to six howitzers by the arrival of a section of two from C (Howitzer) Battery of 108 Brigade on 27 January 1917.

CVII

  • This brigade was originally comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. It was placed under command of the 24th Division. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade then remained with the division throughout the war: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • On 13 May the Brigade Ammunition Column left, being merged into the 24th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 13 May 1916 D Battery left, becoming the B Battery of 109 Brigade. The D (Howitzer) Battery of that brigade joined in its place.
    • On 3 October 1916 the field gun batteries were made up to six guns each: a two-gun section from what had been B Battery of 109 Brigade joined A Battery, and B and C Batteries were each joined by a section from 109 Brigade’s C Battery.
    • D (Howitzer) Battery was also brought up to six howitzers by the arrival of a section of two from C (Howitzer) Battery of 108 Brigade on 27 January 1917.

CVIII

  • This brigade was originally comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. It was placed under command of the 24th Division. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade then remained with the division until it left to become an Army Brigade RFA on 27 January 1917: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • On 13 May the Brigade Ammunition Column left, being merged into the 24th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 13 May 1916 D Battery left, becoming the C Battery of 109 Brigade. The B (Howitzer) Battery of that brigade joined in its place and was renamed as D (Howitzer) Battery.
    • On 3 October 1916 the brigade was reorganised and the batteries became six-gun units. A Battery was broken up, with one of its two-gun sections going to join B and C Batteries respectively. Five days later 522 (Howitzer) Battery arrived from England and was renamed as A (Howitzer) Battery. On 13 October C Battery was renamed as A Battery and A (Howitzer) Battery was renamed as C (Howitzer) Battery.
    • On 27 January 1917 the brigade left 24th Division and became an army Brigade. At that point C (Howitzer) Battery was broken up, with two-howitzer sections going to the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 106 and 107 Brigades respectively. C Battery joined from 96 Brigade of 21st Division and became 108 Brigade’s new C Battery. A section of two howitzers arrived from D (Howitzer) Battery of 96 Brigade and was added to D (Howitzer) Battery to bring it up to six.

CIX (Howitzer)

  • This brigade was originally comprised of A, B, C and D (Howitzer) Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. It was placed under command of the 24th Division. The batteries were all armed with four 4.5-inch howitzers. The brigade then remained with the division until it was broken up on 3 October 1916: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • On 13 May the Brigade Ammunition Column left, being merged into the 24th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 3 December 1915 C (Howitzer) Battery left to join 131 (Howitzer) Brigade of 2nd Canadian Division.
    • On 13 May 1916 the brigade was reorganised. A, B and D (Howitzer) Batteries all left to joinj106, 108 and 107 Brigades respectively, all becoming those brigades’ D (Howitzer) Battery. The D Batteries (field gun units) of 106, 107 and 108 Brigades joined and became 109’s new A, B and C Batteries respectively.
    • On 3 October 1916 the brigade wasbroken up. A Battery and half of B went to 106 Brigade; C Battery and the other half of B went to 107 Brigade; they were used to bring the batteries of those brigades up to six guns each.

Links

The Batteries and Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery

24th Division

The Order of Battle of Divisions