CXXIII, CXXIV, CXXV and CXXVI (Howitzer) Brigades (37th Divisional Artillery)

The three field gun brigades (CXXIII, CXXIV and CXXV) were originally raised under orders for the establishment of the 31st Division, one of the formations of the Fourth New Army. In April 1915 this New Army was broken up and 31st Division ceased to exist: the artillery components were at first transferred to general reserve. (The 31st Division that replaced it was originally called the 38th Division and was from the Fifth New Army).

The howitzer brigade (CXXVI) was originally raised under orders for the establishment of the 32nd Division, also one of the formations of the Fourth New Army. In April 1915 this Division also ceased to exist: the brigade was transferred to general reserve. (The 32nd Division that replaced it was originally called the 39th Division and was from the Fifth New Army).

On 15 April 1915 all four brigades were transferred to the 37th Division.

CXXIII

  • The brigade was comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade remained with 37th Division throughout the rest of the war: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • Between 21 and 23 May 1916 the Ammunition Column left, to be merged with the 37th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 4 June 1916 A Battery left, becoming the C Battery of 126 Brigade. D Battery was renamed as A Battery. B (Howitzer) Battery joined from 126 Brigade and became the new D (Howitzer) Battery.
    • On 30 August B Battery was split up, with its two-gun sections going to A and C Batteries to bring them up to six guns each. B Battery joined from 125 Brigade.
    • On 25 January 1917 C (Howitzer) Battery of 126 Brigade was split up, with two-howitzer sections going to the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 123 and 124 Brigades to bring them up to six howitzers each.

CXXIV

  • The brigade was comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade remained with 37th Division throughout the rest of the war: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • Between 21 and 23 May 1916 the Ammunition Column left, to be merged with the 37th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 4 June 1916 A and D Batteries left, becoming the A and B Batteries of 126 Brigade. C Battery joined from 125 Brigade and became A Battery, and A (Howitzer) Battery joined from 126 Brigade and was renamed as D (Howitzer) Battery.
    • On 25 January 1917 C (Howitzer) Battery of 126 Brigade was split up, with two-howitzer sections going to the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 123 and 124 Brigades to bring them up to six howitzers each

CXXV

  • The brigade was comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The batteries were all armed with four 18-pounder field guns. The brigade then remained with the 37th Division until it was broken up: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • Between 21 and 23 May 1916 the Ammunition Column left, to be merged with the 38th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 4 June 1916 C Battery left, becoming the A Battery of 124 Brigade. D Battery was renamed as C Battery. C (Howitzer) Battery joined from 126 Brigade and became this brigade’s D (Howitzer) Battery.
    • On 31 August 1916 the brigade was broken up. A Battery was split up to bring B and C Batteries to six guns each; C Battery then moved to 124 Brigade and D (Howitzer) Battery went to 126 Brigade.

CXXVI (Howitzer)

  • The brigade was comprised of A, B, C and D Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The batteries were all armed with four 4.5-inch howitzers. The brigade then remained with the 37th Division until it was broken up in late January 1917: you can see details of its battles and movements on the page describing the division.
    • On 7 February 1916 D (Howitzer) Battery and the associated part of the Brigade Ammunition Column were transferred to the 48th (South Midland) Division to become D (Howitzer) Battery of 243 Brigade. It was replaced by D (Howitzer) Battery joining from 242 Brigade of that division on 18 May 1916.
    • Between 21 and 23 May 1916 the Ammunition Column left, to be merged with the 38th Divisional Ammunition Column.
    • On 30 August 1916 B Battery was split up to bring A and C Batteries to six guns each; D (Howitzer) Battery joined from 125 Brigade.
    • 502 (Howitzer) Battery joined on 9 October 1916 and was renamed as C (Howitzer). It was broken up on 25 January 1917, to bring the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 123 and 124 Brigades up to six howitzers each.
    • On 25 January 1917 A Battery moved to join 18 Brigade RFA and B went to 282 Brigade RFA.
    • Finally D (Howitzer) Battery was split up on 28 January 1917 to bring the was split up to bring the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 18 and 282 Brigades RFA to six howitzers each, and the brigade ceased to exist.

Links

The Batteries and Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery

37th Division

Order of Battle of Divisions