CCXX, CCXXI, CCXXII and CCXXIII (Howitzer) Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery

These units was formed in 1908 for the new Territorial Force. They were originally known as the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th (Howitzer) Home Counties Brigades RFA.

Each of the units raised a “second line” in September 1914 which were organised into the 67th (2nd Home Counties) Division.

CCXX (1/1st Home Counties)

  • The 1st Home Counties Brigade RFA TF was based at the drill hall on Church Street in Brighton. It comprised a headquarters, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Sussex Batteries and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The 3rd Battery was based at Marmion Road in Hove. Each battery was armed with four obsolescent 15-pounder field guns.
  • The brigade came under orders of the Home Counties Division and went to India with the division, landing in early December 1914 but leaving the Ammunition Column at home. Between 7-12 December 1915 it landed at Basra for service in Mesopotamia. The brigade returned to India in July 1916.
  • In 1916 the brigade was renamed as 220 Brigade RFA Tf and the batteries were lettered A, B and C.
  • During 1917 the batteries were re-armed with the modern 18-pounder field gun and were renamed as 1064, 1065 and 1066 Batteries. Two-gun sections of 1065 were then moved to bring 1064 and 1066 up to six guns each. 1065 Battery was then disbanded. At some point, the brigade was provided with an ammunition column.
  • The brigade returned to Mesopotamia, landing at Basra 18-23 October 1917 and placed under command of 17th (Indian) Division.

CCXXI (1/2nd Home Counties)

  • The 2nd Home Counties Brigade RFA TF was based at the drill hall The Goffs in Eastbourne. It comprised a headquarters, the 4th, 5th and 6th Sussex Batteries and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The 5th Battery was based in St. Leonards and the 6th in Bexhill-on-Sea, while the ammunition column was at Hailsham. Each battery was armed with four obsolescent 15-pounder field guns.
  • The brigade came under orders of the Home Counties Division and went to India with the division, landing in early December 1914 but leaving the Ammunition Column at home.
  • In 1916 the brigade was renamed as 221 Brigade RFA TF and the batteries were lettered A, B and C.
  • During 1917 the batteries were re-armed with the modern 18-pounder field gun and were renamed as 1067, 1068 and 1069 Batteries. Two-gun sections of 1069 were then moved to bring 1067 and 1068 up to six guns each. 1069 Battery was then disbanded. At some point, the brigade was provided with an ammunition column.
  • The brigade moved to Mesopotamia, landing at Basra 18-25 October 1917 and placed under command of 17th (Indian) Division.

CCXXII (1/3rd Home Counties) (Cinque Ports)

  • The 3rd Home Counties Brigade RFA TF was based at the drill hall on Liverpool Street in Dover. It comprised a headquarters, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Kent Batteries and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The 2nd Battery was at Folkestone; 3rd at Ramsgate and the Ammunition Column at Sandwich and Deal. Each battery was armed with four obsolescent 15-pounder field guns.
  • The brigade came under orders of the Home Counties Division and went to India with the division, landing in early December 1914 but leaving the Ammunition Column at home. On 21 May 1916 it landed at Basra for service in Mesopotamia and was placed under orders of 15th (Indian) Division.
  • In 1916 the brigade was renamed as 222 Brigade RFA TF and the batteries were lettered A, B and C. At some point the batteries were re-armed with the modern 18-pounder field gun and were renamed as 1070, 1071 and 1072 Batteries. Two-gun sections of 1071 were then moved to bring 1070 and 1072 up to six guns each. 1071 Battery was then disbanded.

1/4th Home Counties (Howitzer)

  • The 4th Home Counties Brigade RFA TF was based at Bexley Road in Erith. It comprised a headquarters, the 4th and 5th Kent (Howitzer) Batteries and the Brigade Ammunition Column. The 2nd Battery was at Folkestone; 3rd at Ramsgate and the Ammunition Column at Sandwich and Deal. Each battery was armed with four obsolescent 5-inch howitzers.
  • The battery joined 27th Division in France in December 1914, having been converted into its Ammunition Column. It returned to England when the division was ordered to Salonika in late 1915 and went back to France, having been re-equipped with new 4.5-inch howitzers, on 10 March 1916. On 9 June 1916 it was placed under command of the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division.
  • On 24 June 1916 the brigade was renumbered as 223 Brigade and the batteries became A and B (Howitzer) Batteries.
  • On 18 July 1916 A (Howitzer) Battery left to join 318 Brigade RFA as its D (Howitzer) Battery. This brigade had recently joined 63rd (Royal Naval) Division from the confusingly similar 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division.
  • On 26 July 1916 B (Howitzer) Battery left to join 316 Brigade RFA as its D (Howitzer) Battery and the Ammunition Column was absorbed into the 63rd Divisional Ammunition Column. 316 Brigade had also recently joined 63rd (Royal Naval) Division from  63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division.
  • hat had been 318 Brigade was then renumbered as a new 223 Brigade.

Home Counties Division Ammunition Column

  • This unit does not appear to have been formed.

Links

Other Royal Field Artillery units

44th (Home Counties) Division

27th Division

63rd (Royal Naval) Division

63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division

Order of Battle of Divisions

Territorial Force