CCLXX, CCLXXI, CCLXXII (Howitzer) and CCLXXIII Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery (54th Divisional Artillery)

These units were established as part of the Territorial Force when it came into existence in 1908. They were originally known as the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th (Howitzer) East Anglian Brigades RFA and from 26 May 1916 as 270, 271, 272 (Howitzer) and 273 Brigades RFA. Note (see below) that two of them exchanged numbers in 1916.

The brigades came under orders of the East Anglian Division, which was later renamed as the 54th (East Anglian) Division. The rest of the order of battle of the division can be seen via the link below. The artillery did not accompany the division when it left England in July 1915 for service at Gallipoli. It rejoined the division in Egypt in February 1916 after going via France on 17 November 1915. While in France it was attached to 33rd Division.

CCLXX (1st East Anglian) later CCLXXII

  • The brigade was headquartered at The Green in Stratford in East London and comprised the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Essex Batteries and a Brigade Ammunition Column. All were at Stratford except 2nd Essex Battery at Romford and 3rd Essex Battery at Grays. Each battery was eventually equipped with four 18-pounder field guns.
  • 26 May 1916: batteries renamed as A, B and C Batteries.
  • 21 Becember 1916: C Battery was broken up, sending two-gun sections to bring A and B up to six guns each.
  • Also 21 December 1916: brigade was renamed as 272 Brigade RFA.
  • 20 January 1917: Brigade Ammunition Column left to merge into a new Divisional Ammunition Column.
  • 26 June 1917: C (Howitzer) Battery joined from 271 Brigade RFA and was named as C (Howitzer) Battery.
  • 1 July 1917: A Battery left to join 264 Brigade of 52nd Divisional artillery.
  • 2 March 1918: A Battery rejoined from 264 Brigade.

CCLXXI (2nd East Anglian)

  • The brigade was headquartered at Surrey Street in Norwich and comprised the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Norfolk Batteries and a Brigade Ammunition Column. Each battery was eventually equipped with four 18-pounder field guns.
  • 26 May 1916: batteries renamed as A, B and C Batteries.
  • 20 December 1916: C Battery was broken up, sending two-gun sections to bring A and B up to six guns each.
  • Also 20 December 1916: A (Howitzer) Battery joined from 272 Brigade RFA and was named as C (Howitzer) Battery.
  • 20 January 1917: Brigade Ammunition Column left to merge into a new Divisional Ammunition Column.
  • 25 June 1917: C (Howitzer) Battery left to join 272 Brigade RFA.
  • 5 June 1918: 440 Battery joined.

CCLXXII (3rd East Anglian) (Howitzer)

  • The brigade was headquartered at Great Gipping Street in Ipswich and comprised the 1st and 2nd Suffolk (Howitzer) Batteries and a Brigade Ammunition Column. All were at Ipswich except 1st Battery and the Ammunition Column which were at Lowestoft. Each battery was eventually equipped with four 4.5-inch howitzers.
  • 28 May 1916: batteries renamed as A and B (Howitzer) Batteries.
  • 21 December 1916: brigade was broken up. A (Howitzer) Battery left to join 271 Brigade as its C (Howitzer) Battery., and B (Howitzer) Battery left to join 270 Brigade as its C (Howitzer) Battery. The Ammunition Column was split into two sections, which accompanied the two howitzer batteries to their respective new brigades.

CCLXXIV (4th East Anglian) later CCLXX

  • The brigade was headquartered at St. Andrew’s Street in Hertford and comprised the 1st and 2nd Hertfordshire Batteries (at St Alban’s and Watford respectively), the Northamptonshire Battery (Peterborough) and a Brigade Ammunition Column (Hertford). Each battery was eventually equipped with four 18-pounder field guns.
  • 29 May 1916: batteries renamed as A, B and C Batteries.
  • 21 December 1916: B Battery was broken up, sending two-gun sections to bring A and C up to six guns each.
  • Also 21 December 1916: C Battery was then renamed B Battery.
  • Also 21 December 1916: the brigade was renamed as 270 Brigade RFA.
  • Also 21 December 1916: B (Howitzer) Battery joined from 272 Brigade RFA and was named as C (Howitzer) Battery.
  • 20 January 1917: Brigade Ammunition Column left to merge into a new Divisional Ammunition Column.

Divisional Ammunition Column

  • The DAC was not formed until after the division had mobilised. It formed a Divisional Ammunition Park which did go with the rest of the division to Gallipoli: it landed at Suvla Bay on 16 August 1915.
  • The rest of the Column moved to France with the rest of the divisional artillery in November 1915.
  • 29 January 1916: transferred to 55th (West Lancashire) Division. One officer and 53 men did not transfer and went to Egypt with the rest of the divisional artillery in early 1916.
  • 20 January 1917: a new Column formed in Egypt 20 July 1917 by absorbing the Brigade Ammunition Columns.

Other artillery

The East Anglian (Essex) Heavy Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery was under divisional command until July 1915. It eventually went to France in March 1916.

Links

The Batteries and Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery

54th (East Anglian) Division

Order of Battle of Divisions